Archive for January, 2009

In which The Gay Recluse sings a song. Here’s the latest from DeathCulture@Sea — aka the staff here, some papers towels, an acoustic guitar and a book (oh and chopsticks and a silver plate) — a song inspired by our recent remembrance of shoegazing past (even though this is more an attempt at lo-fi Spacemen […]


In which The Gay Recluse reads Roberto Bolaño in stages. In our experience, one test of a great novel is whether you find yourself altered as you ingest the text, so that your mental dialog seems to be narrated by the writer in question. This is one of the strengths of the form, to the […]


On Nowhere

29Jan09

In which The Gay Recluse remembers Ride. The opening chords of “Vapour Trail” are high and open, yet filled with same (phase-shifted) melancholy we associate with ringing church bells. To hear this the other day, as we plodded through our thirty minutes on the elliptical at the gym, was to be swept away with a sense of forgotten potential — […]


In which The Gay Recluse holds a contest. Sort of. Today we heard from Mike, who’s taking a break from Rottin’ in Denmark to travel our great country in search of hot gay statues (among other things). He writes: I was shocked when I found this in SF this week. Does it count? It’s about […]


In which The Gay Recluse ponders Junot Diaz and the purpose of novels. Today we finished The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz. For obv reasons — namely, the book won every award last year — our expectations were high, and but for the most part were met. In case we’re only the second-to-last […]


In which The Gay Recluse drinks virtual wine. Photographer Dino Dinco sent us an announcement for his art opening on Wednesday night, and — hey! — if we were in San Francisco, we’d totally go. Dinco’s show (click here for gallery info) includes shots of the desolate “cruising trails” in L.A. (somewhat ironically located near […]


In which The Gay Recluse dreams of spring. With the afternoon light streaming through the windows, it was easy to believe.